Teradata SQL Error and Failure Codes from Error 6847 To 6856

SQLServerF1_Header_Small

6847 The %FSTR routine must be LOCAL. %VSTR
Explanation: The routine must be a Teradata internal LOCAL (fast-path) routine: — Teradata Internal User Defined Type
routines must be declared LOCAL. — The CAST routine specified in a CREATE/REPLACE CAST statement must be
declared LOCAL if the Source data type or Target data type or both Source and Target are Internal UDT.
Generated By: RES modules.
For Whom: End User.
Remedy: Correct the statement and resubmit the query.

6848 The UDT already has a Transform group
Explanation: A Transform group has been defined for this UDT.
Generated By: RES modules.
For Whom: End User.
Remedy: If CREATE TRANSFORM is desired for this UDT, drop the existing Transform group first by issuing the
“DROP TRANSFORM” statement, and resubmit the CREATE TRANSFORM statement.

6849 The UDT (%VSTR) does not have Transform, or does not have the specified Transform Group.
Explanation: The UDT does not have a Transform group defined for it, or the Transform Group name defined for the
UDT does not match the Transform Group name specified in the DDL statement.
Generated By: RES modules.
For Whom: End User.
Remedy: Correct the query and re-submit.

6850 The UDT already has Ordering
Explanation: Ordering has been defined for this UDT.
Generated By: RES modules.
For Whom: End User.
Remedy: If CREATE ORDERING is desired for this UDT, drop the existing Ordering first by issuing the “DROP ORDERING”
statement, and resubmit the CREATE ORDERING statement.

6851 PARTITIONS WHERE clause only allowed for PPI tables with 2-byte partitioning.
Explanation: The user is trying to perform a backup or restore operation with a PARTITIONS WHERE clause on a table
that does not have a partitioning or that has 8-byte or column partitioning.
Generated By: OPT modules.
For Whom: End User.
Remedy: Nonpartitioned, 8-byte partitioned, and column-partitioned tables can only support full-table BAR. Remove
the PARTITIONS WHERE clause and re-submit the job. Alternatively, change the table to have 2-byte row partitioning
without column partitioning.

6852 PARTITIONS WHERE clause needs to be simplified
Explanation: The user is trying to perform an archive or restore operation of selected partitions but the PARTITIONS
WHERE condition defining the partitions selected all the partitions. Or, if the ALL PARTITIONS clause was specified for a restore, the well-defined bounding condition from the archive is not compatible with the current partitioning of the table. This can happen if the condition references columns that are not partitioning columns or if the condition is not compatible with the current partitioning of the table. For ALL PARTITIONS , even if the bounding condition is well-defined, this error may occur if the partitioning of the table has changed significantly due to altering of the partitioning. This error may also occur if the user is trying to perform a selected partitions archive or restore operation of a PPI table having one or more TIMESTAMP partitioning columns.
Generated By: OPT modules.
For Whom: End User.
Remedy: If you specified ALL PARTITIONS, resubmit specifying an appropriate condition in a PARTITIONS WHERE
clause. If you specified a PARTITIONS WHERE condition, you may need to rewrite the condition to be simpler such that is
selects the desired partitions. You can try “hard-coding” the PARTITIONS WHERE option by using the system-derived
PARTITION column. Experiment with EXPLAINs of a simple SELECT query using various WHERE condition formulations
and when you have something that will only scan a limited number of partitions, re-submit the job. Alternatively, you
can always resort to full-table archive or restore by removing the PARTITIONS WHERE option; if doing a restore, you may
want to restore into a staging table, delete desired rows from the target table, and then insert-select the appropriate rows into the target table.

6853 Too many partition ranges qualified
Explanation: The user is trying to perform a backup or restore operation with a PARTITIONS WHERE clause that
results in too many distinct partition ranges to scan. This might occur if your WHERE clause enumerated distinct partition values such as “WHERE PARTITION IN (1,3,5,etc.)” instead of using a range of values such as with “WHERE PARTITION BETWEEN 1 AND 1000”. The former expression results in every odd number being a distinct partition range whereas the latter is only a single partition range. Up to 100 distinct partition ranges are supported.
Generated By: OPT modules.
For Whom: End User.
Remedy: Simplify the PARTITIONS WHERE clause and re-submit the job.

6854 Invalid WHERE clause.
Explanation: The WHERE clause is syntactically correct, but it is not appropriate. It references tables other than the target table, it does not reference the target table at all, or it contains aggregation, statistical, or ordered analytic functions.
Generated By: OPT modules.
For Whom: End User.
Remedy: Rewrite the WHERE clause and re-submit the job.

6856 Restore error table has wrong structure.
Explanation: The user is attempting to perform a restore of selected partitions but the indicated error table has the
wrong structure to proceed. This could happen if the error table to use was NOT previously created earlier by a dictionary restore job or if it was created for a different table structure than what you currently want to restore.
Generated By: OPT modules.
For Whom: End User.
Remedy: Compare the list of columns and data types of the referenced error table to the table being restored and to the
user documentation for the column structure that should be generated. If you have merely referenced the wrong error table you can change the RESTORE or COPY job to use the correct one with the ERRORDB or ERRORTABLES option. If the desired error table does not exist, you will want to contact Teradata Support to audit the restore steps that you have performed so far before re-running the dictionary restore step.

Above are list of Teradata Errors or Failure Codes from Error 6847 To 6856 received while performing certain operation against Teradata Database or related products.

What are Teradata Database Errors?

In general, each Teradata error message contains the following information:
• The message number.
• The message text. This text is usually returned with the message number. Some messages employ word substitution, where the word substituted represents the system-replacement of a term more specific to the occurrence.
• An explanation of how the error may have occurred.
• Generated-by text that indicates the software module which initiated the message. This field serves a diagnostic purpose for support and development personnel.
• A remedy which suggests how to resolve the condition.

Hope this was helpful.

Thanks,
SQLServerF1 Team
Information about Teradata SQL Error and Failure Codes and Error Messages on Windows, Linux Operating Systems.

 

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