Comparing Installation Options Available for SQL Server on Azure VM

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In the below mentioned previous post, we have discussed about different installation options available for SQL Server on Azure VM
Different Installation Options Available for SQL Server on Azure VM
It is important to understand the differences in the three option mentioned in the above post.
– Create a SysPreppedImage of the SQL Server version of our choice on an hyper-v VM on out local environment and then Upload it to Azure.
– Create a virtual machine running Windows from the Azure portal and then install SQL Server on it.
– Provision a SQL Server virtual machine in Azure from the Azure portal.

SysPreppedImage of the SQL Server on Hyper-V VM and Upload to Azure is preferred when you want to use your own licenses for Windows Operating System and SQL Server, so that you only need to pay for Azure compute and storage costs incurred for hosting your VM with SQL Server on Azure. Since SQL Server 2008 R2, has introduced of performing a SysPrep image, and the steps are simple. In this DBAs can choose and install required SQL Server versions and patches and required Operating System versions and patches instead of depending up on the versions provided by Microsoft Azure. However this is the most time consuming task of the three methods as this involves buinding hyper-v VM and preparing SQL Server SysPrep image and then uploading the VHD files to the Azure and then use it to create the VM. This is preferred when you want to use your own licenses which you are have, to avoid using Microsoft licensing available for Windows OS and SQL Server from Microsoft on per-minute usage basis.

Create a virtual machine running Windows is preferred you want to use your own license of SQL Server, but use the license of Windows Operating System provided by Microsoft, however the licensing of the Windows OS usage, compute and storage usage of Azure VM are calculated on the per-minute basis. SO, In this case, we pay only for the per-minute for the Azure Compute, Storage, and Windows license but not for the SQL Server license. In this DBAs can choose and install required SQL Server versions and patches. This involves additional work of installing SQL Server, its patches.

Provision a SQL Server virtual machine in Azure is preferred when you do not want to use any of your own licenses, instead only want to dependent or use the Microsoft licenses, but this usage is mostly calculated on per-minute basis. In this we need to pay per-minute for a SQL Server license along with an Azure Compute, Storage, and Windows license. This allows us to install SQL Server at desired version and service pack level, thus reducing the time taken for SQL Server installation along with VM setup and these things can be done from Azure portal with simple clicks and providing the options. This is best suited for applications which are required for short time for testing and later can be shutdown, thus brings down the cost.

Hope this was helpful.

This is applicable for below versions of SQL Server

SQL Server 2008 R2
SQL Server 2012
SQL Server 2014
SQL Server 2016

Thanks,
SQLServerF1 Team
In-Depth Blogs on SQL Server, Information about SQL Server Conferences and Events, Frequently asked questions, SQL Server Trainings

 

Different Installation Options Available for SQL Server on Azure VM

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Cloud solutions has been gaining increased support and many customers moving their data on to cloud technologies or planning to move in future. Once management decides on moving the SQL Server on to Azure, there are two options either to choose Infrastructure as Service (IaaS) or SQL Azure database as service (PaaS). If the management decides to have more control on the SQL Server and decides to use the Infrastructure as service option(IaaS), then next step would be is to get the SQL Server installed and running on the Microsoft Azure VM. There are different ways in which we can get SQL Server installed and running on the Azure VM which depend on factors mainly like Licensing. Depending on the type of licensing we choose for, we can have below options for getting SQL Server on the Microsoft Azure VM.

– Create a SysPreppedImage of the SQL Server version of our choice on an hyper-v VM on out local environment and then Upload it to Azure.
– Create a virtual machine running Windows from the Azure portal and then install SQL Server on it.
– Provision a SQL Server virtual machine in Azure from the Azure portal.
SysPreppedImage of the SQL Server on Hyper-V VM and Upload to Azure – In this method, we can use the SQL Server SysPrep install which creates a SQL Server image, which can be used to complete and create a full SQL Server instance on any other servers. Once the SQL Server SysPrep image has been created on a hyper-v VM, next step is to upload the VHD file of the hyper-v VM to Azure Blob storage. Now we can use the uploaded VHD file and create an image from Azure Management portal.

Create a virtual machine running Windows – In this method, we can create a windows virtual machine from the Azure portal. There is an option available on Azure portal to provision a Windows Server image. Once the Windows VM is created, next step is to copy SQL Server installation media on to the newly created VM and install the SQL Server on our own.

Provision a SQL Server virtual machine in Azure – In this method, we can install SQL Server directly on a windows VM from Azure portal. This method is an easy way to get SQL Server installed on the new windows Azure VM on Microsoft Azure.

All the three methods mentioned above have their own advantages and disadvantages interms of licensing, cost, etc. Depending on the requirement, DBAs and management can choose the appropriate method best suited for their environment.

Hope this was helpful.

This is applicable for below versions of SQL Server

SQL Server 2008 R2
SQL Server 2012
SQL Server 2014
SQL Server 2016

Thanks,
SQLServerF1 Team
In-Depth Blogs on SQL Server, Information about SQL Server Conferences and Events, Frequently asked questions, SQL Server Trainings

 

Introduction to SQLAzure for SQL Server DBAs

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Microsoft has been aggressively focussing on promoting cloud technology. As a SQL Server DBA, one might wonder what is all about this cloud and how this works and how this impacts their role as a DBA. Although the terminology may be different, but a lot about cloud may already known to you or worked on, but may be not able to correlate to what you already know. For SQL Server Microsoft is offering two cloud platforms, one of which is Infrastructure as a service and the other one is database as a service.

Infrastructure as a service – This is similar like a hyper-v or VMWare VM, where you have a VM machine on which you install and manage SQL Server instances, databases and jobs, etc. The only difference is the VMWARE or Hyper-V management is taken care by your client company or your company, where in case of Microsoft Azure cloud the infrastructure is taken care by Microsoft and as a DBA, we need to take care of installing SQL Server, patching, maintenance, administration similar to what we used to do, but just on a Microsoft data centre.

Database as a service – This might be something different and which many DBAs may not be familiar about. In this the OS, Network, Storage and also SQL Server installation, patching, Backups, etc are taken care by Microsoft and we as DBAs are not responsible for such tasks, instead we can focus on other tasks such as migrating data from on-premise SQL Server to SQL Azure cloud and checking and working on making the SQL Server database resilient for performance. Database as a service is not a regular SQL Server instance which we used to manage on-premise, instead there are lot of limitations on what we can do and what changes we can make, for example, we cannot change many instance settings directly, we cannot alter storage configuration, or tempdb configuration, etc, instead we focus more at the database level and at data level.

If you are wondering what are the advantages for choosing SQLZure cloud solution is mainly reduction in cost of maintaining hardware and SQL Server maintenance of patches/backups, etc. Depending on the criticality of our database server and application, we can choose different kind of licensing based on our requirement of performance, data recovery and Disaster recovery features. So, for small test/dev servers you can choose servers with basic or minimal cost configuration and for productions servers depending on the size and usage of the database we can choose appropriate license. Different types of licensing includes, Basic, Standard and Premium and these are sub divided into S0-S1-S2-S3 for Standard and P1-P2-P3 for Premium.

As our data is stored on cloud on third party vendor place, it is important to understand how quickly we can recover our data and how much of data loss can occur in case there is a disaster, for which there are different types of Disaster recovery strategies to choose from, which include Geo-Restore, Standard Geo-Replication, Active Geo-Replication. In Geo-Restore, a copy of database can be restored on another region, but this will have data older than 24 hours, thus may not be good option for production data, instead can be used for dev. In Standard Geo-Replication, we can recover data up to 30 minutes before crash and can take up to 2 hours for the restore to complete and database to be available, but this will increase the cost. Finally, Active Geo-Replication, the data loss could be reduced to 5 minutes and amount of time to restore would about about an hour, this further increases the cost. Depending on our requirement, we can choose the best solution that suits.

in SQLZure, there is something known as DTU(Database Throughput Unit), which is used to measure the performance we get out of our SQLZure instance. DTU is a combined measure of CPU, Memory and IO of a database on a server and we can use this to compare the performance of database between different servers.

Hope this was helpful.

This is applicable for below versions of SQL Server

SQL Server 2008 R2
SQL Server 2012
SQL Server 2014
SQL Server 2016

Thanks,
SQLServerF1 Team
In-Depth Blogs on SQL Server, Information about SQL Server Conferences and Events, Frequently asked questions, SQL Server Trainings