Oracle Database Errors or Warnings from Error ORA-14101 to ORA-14110

SQLServerF1

ORA-14101: partition extended table name cannot refer to a synonym
Cause: User attempted to use partition-extended table name syntax in conjunction with synonym name which is illegal
Action: Correct the statement and reenter
ORA-14102: only one LOGGING or NOLOGGING clause may be specified
Cause: LOGGING was specified more than once, NOLOGGING was specified more than once, or both LOGGING and NOLOGGING were specified.
Action: Remove all but one of the LOGGING or NOLOGGING clauses and reissue the statement.
ORA-14103: LOGGING/NOLOGGING may not be combined with RECOVERABLE/UNRECOVERABLE
Cause: A statement contained both [NO]LOGGING and [UN]RECOVERABLE clauses which is disallowed.
Action: Remove one of the offending clauses. [UN]RECOVERABLE is being deprecated in V8 and will be obsoleted in V9. To duplicate semantics of UNRECOVERABLE clause, create an object with NOLOGGING option and then ALTER it specifying LOGGING. To duplicate semantics of RECOVERABLE clause, create an object with LOGGING option.

ORA-14104: RECOVERABLE/UNRECOVERABLE may not be specified for partitioned tables/indices
Cause: CREATE TABLE/INDEX statement used to create a partitioned table/index contained RECOVERABLE or UNRECOVERABLE clause which is illegal
Action: Remove offending clause. [UN]RECOVERABLE is being deprecated in V8 and will be obsoleted in V9. To duplicate semantics of UNRECOVERABLE clause, create an object with NOLOGGING option and then ALTER it specifying LOGGING. To duplicate semantics of RECOVERABLE clause, create an object with LOGGING option.
ORA-14105: RECOVERABLE/UNRECOVERABLE may not be specified in this context
Cause: RECOVERABLE/UNRECOVERABLE clause is not allowed in this context.
Action: Remove offending clause. RECOVERABLE/UNRECOVERABLE may only be specified in CREATE TABLE/INDEX statement describing a non-partitioned table or index and ALTER INDEX REBUILD statement. [UN]RECOVERABLE is being deprecated in V8 and will be obsoleted in V9. To duplicate semantics of UNRECOVERABLE clause, create an object with NOLOGGING option and then ALTER it specifying LOGGING. To duplicate semantics of RECOVERABLE clause, create an object with LOGGING option.
ORA-14106: LOGGING/NOLOGGING may not be specified for a clustered table
Cause: User attempted to specify LOGGING or NOLOGGING clausein CREATE TABLE or ALTER TABLE statement involving a clustered table
Action: Remove offending clause.

ORA-14107: partition specification is required for a partitioned object
Cause: parameter which supplies partition name is missing. This parameter is optional for non-partitioned objects, but is required for partitioned objects.
Action: supply missing parameter
ORA-14108: illegal partition-extended table name syntax
Cause: Partition to be accessed may only be specified using its name. User attempted to use a partition number or a bind variable.
Action: Modify statement to refer to a partition using its name
ORA-14109: partition-extended object names may only be used with tables
Cause: User attempted to use a partition-extended object name with an object which is not a table.
Action: Avoid using partition-extended name syntax with objects which are not tables
ORA-14110: partitioning column may not be of type ROWID
Cause: Partitioning column specified by the user was of type ROWID, which is illegal.
Action: Ensure that no partitioning column is of type ROWID.

Above are list of Oracle Database Errors or Warnings from Error ORA-14101 to ORA-14110 received while performing certain operation against Oracle Database or related products.

What are Oracle Database Error Messages?

Oracle Error Messages may be returned while using products which are part of Oracle Database. Each Oracle Database Error or Warning Message mentioned above contains the Warning or Error Message Statement, a short explanation of the probable causes of the Error message, and a recommended action.

Hope this was helpful.

Thanks,
SQLServerF1 Team
Information about Oracle Database Error Messages or Warning Messages on Windows and Linux Operating Systems.

 

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