Comparing Installation Options Available for SQL Server on Azure VM

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In the below mentioned previous post, we have discussed about different installation options available for SQL Server on Azure VM
Different Installation Options Available for SQL Server on Azure VM
It is important to understand the differences in the three option mentioned in the above post.
– Create a SysPreppedImage of the SQL Server version of our choice on an hyper-v VM on out local environment and then Upload it to Azure.
– Create a virtual machine running Windows from the Azure portal and then install SQL Server on it.
– Provision a SQL Server virtual machine in Azure from the Azure portal.

SysPreppedImage of the SQL Server on Hyper-V VM and Upload to Azure is preferred when you want to use your own licenses for Windows Operating System and SQL Server, so that you only need to pay for Azure compute and storage costs incurred for hosting your VM with SQL Server on Azure. Since SQL Server 2008 R2, has introduced of performing a SysPrep image, and the steps are simple. In this DBAs can choose and install required SQL Server versions and patches and required Operating System versions and patches instead of depending up on the versions provided by Microsoft Azure. However this is the most time consuming task of the three methods as this involves buinding hyper-v VM and preparing SQL Server SysPrep image and then uploading the VHD files to the Azure and then use it to create the VM. This is preferred when you want to use your own licenses which you are have, to avoid using Microsoft licensing available for Windows OS and SQL Server from Microsoft on per-minute usage basis.

Create a virtual machine running Windows is preferred you want to use your own license of SQL Server, but use the license of Windows Operating System provided by Microsoft, however the licensing of the Windows OS usage, compute and storage usage of Azure VM are calculated on the per-minute basis. SO, In this case, we pay only for the per-minute for the Azure Compute, Storage, and Windows license but not for the SQL Server license. In this DBAs can choose and install required SQL Server versions and patches. This involves additional work of installing SQL Server, its patches.

Provision a SQL Server virtual machine in Azure is preferred when you do not want to use any of your own licenses, instead only want to dependent or use the Microsoft licenses, but this usage is mostly calculated on per-minute basis. In this we need to pay per-minute for a SQL Server license along with an Azure Compute, Storage, and Windows license. This allows us to install SQL Server at desired version and service pack level, thus reducing the time taken for SQL Server installation along with VM setup and these things can be done from Azure portal with simple clicks and providing the options. This is best suited for applications which are required for short time for testing and later can be shutdown, thus brings down the cost.

Hope this was helpful.

This is applicable for below versions of SQL Server

SQL Server 2008 R2
SQL Server 2012
SQL Server 2014
SQL Server 2016

Thanks,
SQLServerF1 Team
In-Depth Blogs on SQL Server, Information about SQL Server Conferences and Events, Frequently asked questions, SQL Server Trainings

 

Different Installation Options Available for SQL Server on Azure VM

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Cloud solutions has been gaining increased support and many customers moving their data on to cloud technologies or planning to move in future. Once management decides on moving the SQL Server on to Azure, there are two options either to choose Infrastructure as Service (IaaS) or SQL Azure database as service (PaaS). If the management decides to have more control on the SQL Server and decides to use the Infrastructure as service option(IaaS), then next step would be is to get the SQL Server installed and running on the Microsoft Azure VM. There are different ways in which we can get SQL Server installed and running on the Azure VM which depend on factors mainly like Licensing. Depending on the type of licensing we choose for, we can have below options for getting SQL Server on the Microsoft Azure VM.

– Create a SysPreppedImage of the SQL Server version of our choice on an hyper-v VM on out local environment and then Upload it to Azure.
– Create a virtual machine running Windows from the Azure portal and then install SQL Server on it.
– Provision a SQL Server virtual machine in Azure from the Azure portal.
SysPreppedImage of the SQL Server on Hyper-V VM and Upload to Azure – In this method, we can use the SQL Server SysPrep install which creates a SQL Server image, which can be used to complete and create a full SQL Server instance on any other servers. Once the SQL Server SysPrep image has been created on a hyper-v VM, next step is to upload the VHD file of the hyper-v VM to Azure Blob storage. Now we can use the uploaded VHD file and create an image from Azure Management portal.

Create a virtual machine running Windows – In this method, we can create a windows virtual machine from the Azure portal. There is an option available on Azure portal to provision a Windows Server image. Once the Windows VM is created, next step is to copy SQL Server installation media on to the newly created VM and install the SQL Server on our own.

Provision a SQL Server virtual machine in Azure – In this method, we can install SQL Server directly on a windows VM from Azure portal. This method is an easy way to get SQL Server installed on the new windows Azure VM on Microsoft Azure.

All the three methods mentioned above have their own advantages and disadvantages interms of licensing, cost, etc. Depending on the requirement, DBAs and management can choose the appropriate method best suited for their environment.

Hope this was helpful.

This is applicable for below versions of SQL Server

SQL Server 2008 R2
SQL Server 2012
SQL Server 2014
SQL Server 2016

Thanks,
SQLServerF1 Team
In-Depth Blogs on SQL Server, Information about SQL Server Conferences and Events, Frequently asked questions, SQL Server Trainings

 

Choosing Where to Host SQL Server Database

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Cloud solutions has been gaining increased support and many customers moving their data on to cloud technologies or planning to move in future. When it comes to running SQL Server or hosting a SQL Server database, there are several options for DBAs or management which include On-premise physical server, On-premise Virtual server, Infrastructure as service(IaaS) or SQL Azure database as service(PaaS). There are various factors which can can consider about choosing which applications are better run on which of the above mentioned environment and which features impact on where the SQL Server instance and databases are better hosted in one of the above environments. Below are list of items to consider for choosing where to host SQL Server database from On-premise physical server, On-premise Virtual server, Infrastructure as service(IaaS) or SQL Azure database as service(PaaS).

SQL Server Version Support – If you are looking for flexibility and control over which versions of SQL Server instance and which patches to be applied then any one from On-premise physical server, On-premise Virtual server, Infrastructure as service(IaaS) can be your choice as all these support any version of SQL Server and patches to be applied based on DBA/Developer team recommendations. Where as SQL Azure database as service(PaaS) does not offer this flexibility and allows us to only choose from one the existing versions available and any new patches may be forced at times.
Security – For very critical applications, On-premise physical server, On-premise Virtual server are preferred as these are maintained at our own data centers and brings more control over security. Infrastructure as service(IaaS) can be used for sensitive applications which have high security requirements, but not too very highly critical.

Storage – In On-premise physical server, On-premise Virtual server, the storage support, configuration and its performance is purely determined by the storage teams as per the requirement from the DBAs, Developers and Management. For Infrastructure as service(IaaS) or SQL Azure database as service(PaaS), the storage and its speeds are to be chosen from available options and has different cost for different storage sizes and performance, so based on our requirement we can choose the require storage.

Backups – For On-premise physical server, On-premise Virtual server backups are to be taken care by DBA or backup team and can choose to use native maintenance plans, custom scripts or third party backup tools and can perform backups locally or to backup share or tape. In Infrastructure as service(IaaS) backups can be configured to store locally which is Azure storage. In SQL Azure database as service(PaaS) backups are taken care by Microsoft and we only have to choose how many days the backups are to be stored which decides RTO or RPO. Depending on the settings chosen the cost would be impacted.

Cost – On-premise physical server involves high cost for maintaining hardware, OS, Network, Storage, SQL Server, etc. For On-premise Virtual server the cost of hardware less compare to On-premise physical server as we can use one server host to host multiple guest systems, this reduces the hardware maintenance cost, but this will bring additional cost of administering virtualization, rest all costs remain same for Storage, SQL Server, etc. For Infrastructure as service(IaaS) the cost is further lower as this reduces the hardware maintenance cost as it is taken care by Microsoft, but other costs of Storage, SQL Server, etc will remain same. SQL Azure database as service(PaaS) is the lowest price option available as hardware, and many SQL Server operational costs are reduced as these are taken care by Microsoft.

Suited Applications – On-premise physical server, On-premise Virtual server are better suited for applications which are hosted on our own data center which avoids network latency between applications and databases. Mission critical, data sensitive and high performance required applications are better to be run on On-premise physical server, On-premise Virtual server where we want more control. Infrastructure as service(IaaS) is best for Dev, Test type servers or servers which are not mission critical, but still are important and expected high performance with varied performance at different times. SQL Azure database as service(PaaS) is best suited for new applications developer keeping in mind cloud technologies to take advantage of cloud features.

Hope this was helpful.

This is applicable for below versions of SQL Server

SQL Server 2008 R2
SQL Server 2012
SQL Server 2014
SQL Server 2016

Thanks,
SQLServerF1 Team
In-Depth Blogs on SQL Server, Information about SQL Server Conferences and Events, Frequently asked questions, SQL Server Trainings