Oracle Database Errors or Warnings from Error ORA-12985 to ORA-12994

SQLServerF1

 

ORA-12985: tablespace ‘string’ is read only, cannot dropp column
Cause: An attempt was made to dropp column from a partition/subpartition on a read only tablespace.
Action: Set the tablespace to read write and resubmit statement.
ORA-12986: columns in partially dropped state. Submit ALTERR TABLE DROP COLUMNS CONTINUE
Cause: An attempt was made to access a table with columns in partially dropped state (i.e., drop column operation was interrupted).
Action: Submit ALTERR TABLE DROP COLUMNS CONTINUE to complete the dropp column operation before accessing the table.
ORA-12987: cannot combine drop column with other operations
Cause: An attempt was made to combine drop column with other ALTERR TABLE operations.
Action: Ensure that dropp column is the sole operation specified in ALTERR TABLE.

ORA-12988: cannot dropp column from table owned by SYS
Cause: An attempt was made to dropp a column from a system table.
Action: This action is not allowed
ORA-12989: invalid value for checkpoint interval
Cause: An invalid checkpoint interval specified in statement. Checkpoint interval must be between 0 and (2^31-1).
Action: Correct checkpoint interval and resubmit statement
ORA-12990: duplicate option specified
Cause: Duplicate option specified in statement.
Action: Remove the duplicate option and resubmit statement.

ORA-12991: column is referenced in a multi-column constraint
Cause: An attempt was made to drop a column referenced by some constraints.
Action: Drop all constraints referencing the dropped column or specify CASCADE CONSTRAINTS in statement.
ORA-12992: cannot drop parent key column
Cause: An attempt was made to drop a parent key column.
Action: Drop all constraints referencing the parent key column, or specify CASCADE CONSTRAINTS in statement.
ORA-12993: tablespace ‘string’ is offline, cannot drop column
Cause: An attempt was made to drop a column from a partition/subpartition on an offline tablespace.
Action: Bring the tablespace online and resubmit statement.
ORA-12994: drop column option only allowed once in statement
Cause: An attempt was made to repeat the drop column option in a single statement.
Action: Separate drop column options into different statements and resubmit statements.

Above are list of Oracle Database Errors or Warnings from Error ORA-12985 to ORA-12994 received while performing certain operation against Oracle Database or related products.

What are Oracle Database Error Messages?

Oracle Error Messages may be returned while using products which are part of Oracle Database.  Each Oracle Database Error or Warning Message mentioned above contains the Warning or Error Message Statement, a short explanation of the probable causes of the Error message, and a recommended action.

Hope this was helpful.

Thanks,
SQLServerF1 Team
Information about Oracle Database Error Messages or Warning Messages on Windows and Linux Operating Systems.

 

Oracle Database Errors or Warnings from Error ORA-12940 to ORA-12984

SQLServerF1

ORA-12940: Not enough space in DBVerify text buffer
Cause: DBVerify ran out of text buffer. The error was trapped internally by the system. DBVerify would return the result in text buffer and then resume checking.
Action: None
ORA-12941: DBVerify exception
Cause: DBVerify encountered run-time error. The error signal was trapped internally by the system.
Action: None
ORA-12950: SYSTEM tablespace specified as default permanent tablespace
Cause: SYSTEM tablespace was specified as the default permanent during database creation.
Action: If default permanent tablespace is not specified,then SYSTEM will implicitly become the default permanent tablespace. Specify an alternate tablespace or omit the default tablespace clause and reissue the CREATE DATABASE statement

ORA-12951: Attempt to change default permanent tablespace to temporary
Cause: It is incorrect to alter the default permanent tablespace of a database to temporary type
Action: None
ORA-12980: checkpoint option not allowed with SET UNUSED
Cause: An attempt was made to specify checkpoint option with SET UNUSED.
Action: Remove checkpoint option.
ORA-12981: cannot drop column from an object type table
Cause: An attempt was made to drop a column from an object type table.
Action: This action is not allowed.

ORA-12982: cannot drop column from a nested table
Cause: An attempt was made to drop a column from a nested table.
Action: This action is not allowed.
ORA-12983: cannot drop all columns in a table
Cause: An attempt was made to drop all columns in a table.
Action: Make sure at least one column remains in the table after the drop column operation.
ORA-12984: cannot drop partitioning column
Cause: An attempt was made to drop a column used as the partitioning key.
Action: This action is not allowed.

Above are list of Oracle Database Errors or Warnings from Error ORA-12940 to ORA-12984 received while performing certain operation against Oracle Database or related products.

What are Oracle Database Error Messages?

Oracle Error Messages may be returned while using products which are part of Oracle Database.  Each Oracle Database Error or Warning Message mentioned above contains the Warning or Error Message Statement, a short explanation of the probable causes of the Error message, and a recommended action.

Hope this was helpful.

Thanks,
SQLServerF1 Team
Information about Oracle Database Error Messages or Warning Messages on Windows and Linux Operating Systems.

 

Oracle Database Errors or Warnings from Error ORA-12918 to ORA-12928

SQLServerF1

ORA-12918: Invalid tablespace type for default permanent tablespace
Cause: The tablespace is either dropped, temporary or undo
Action: Check the tablespace type and reissue the statement
ORA-12919: Can not drop the default permanent tablespace
Cause: An attemp was made to drop the default permanent tablespace
Action: Make a different tablespace as the default permanent tablespace and reissue the drop
ORA-12920: database is already in force logging mode
Cause: ALTER DATABASE FORCE LOGGING command failed because the database is already in force logging mode.
Action: None

ORA-12921: database is not in force logging mode
Cause: ALTER DATABASE NO FORCE LOGGING command failed because the database is not in force logging mode.
Action: None
ORA-12922: concurrent ALTER DATABASE [NO] FORCE LOGGING command is running
Cause: There is a concurrent ALTER DATABASE FORCE LOGGING or ALTER DATABASE NO FORCE LOGGING command running in the system.
Action: Contact the database administrator who is responsible for the concurrent command.
ORA-12923: tablespace string is in force logging mode
Cause: An attempt to alter the specified tablespace temporary failed because the tablespace is in force logging mode.
Action: Put the tablespace out of force logging mode by ALTER TABLESPACE NO FORCE LOGGING command.

ORA-12924: tablespace string is already in force logging mode
Cause: An attempt to alter the specified tablespace into force logging mode failed because it is already in force logging mode.
Action: None
ORA-12925: tablespace string is not in force logging mode
Cause: An attempt to alter the specified tablespace out of force logging mode failed because it is not in force logging mode.
Action: None
ORA-12926: FORCE LOGGING option already specified
Cause: In CREATE TABLESPACE, the FORCE LOGGING option was specified more than once.
Action: Remove all but one of the FORCE LOGGING options.
ORA-12927: RETENTION option already specified
Cause: In CREATE TABLESPACE, the RETENTION option was specified more than once.
Action: Remove all but one of the RETENTION options.
ORA-12928: ENCRYPTION option already specified
Cause: In CREATE TABLESPACE, the ENCRYPTION option was specified more than once.
Action: Remove all but one of the ENCRYPTION options.

Above are list of Oracle Database Errors or Warnings from Error ORA-12918 to ORA-12928 received while performing certain operation against Oracle Database or related products.

What are Oracle Database Error Messages?

Oracle Error Messages may be returned while using products which are part of Oracle Database.  Each Oracle Database Error or Warning Message mentioned above contains the Warning or Error Message Statement, a short explanation of the probable causes of the Error message, and a recommended action.

Hope this was helpful.

Thanks,
SQLServerF1 Team
Information about Oracle Database Error Messages or Warning Messages on Windows and Linux Operating Systems.

 

Oracle Database Errors or Warnings from Error ORA-12910 to ORA-12916

SQLServerF1

ORA-12910: cannot specify temporary tablespace as default tablespace
Cause: attempt to assign a temporary tablespace to be a user’s default tablespace
Action: assign a permanent tablespace to be the default tablespace
ORA-12911: permanent tablespace cannot be temporary tablespace
Cause: attempt to assign a permanent tablespace to be a user’s temporary tablespace
Action: assign a temporary tablespace to be user’s temporary tablespace

ORA-12912: Dictionary managed tablespace specified as temporary tablespace
Cause: attempt to assign a dictionary managed tablespace to be a user’s temporary tablespace
Action: Assign a locally managed temporary tablespace to be user’s temporary tablespace
ORA-12913: Cannot create dictionary managed tablespace
Cause: Attemp to create dictionary managed tablespace in database which has system tablespace as locally managed
Action: Create a locally managed tablespace.

ORA-12914: Cannot migrate tablespace to dictionary managed type
Cause: Attemp to migrate locally managed tablespace to dictionary managed type when the database has locally managed system tablespace.
Action: Command cannot be issued.
ORA-12915: Cannot alter dictionary managed tablespace to read write
Cause: Attemp to alter dictionary managed tablespace to read write in database which has system tablespace as locally managed. This tablespace can only be dropped.
Action: Command cannot be issued.
ORA-12916: cannot shrink permanent or dictionary managed tablespace
Cause: An attempt was made to shrink a permanent tablespace or a dictionary managed tablespace.
Action: Check the tablespace type and issue the statement only on locally managed temporary tablespaces.

Above are list of Oracle Database Errors or Warnings from Error ORA-12910 to ORA-12916 received while performing certain operation against Oracle Database or related products.

What are Oracle Database Error Messages?

Oracle Error Messages may be returned while using products which are part of Oracle Database.  Each Oracle Database Error or Warning Message mentioned above contains the Warning or Error Message Statement, a short explanation of the probable causes of the Error message, and a recommended action.

Hope this was helpful.

Thanks,
SQLServerF1 Team
Information about Oracle Database Error Messages or Warning Messages on Windows and Linux Operating Systems.

 

MYSQL Administration Issues – Resetting the Root Password: Unix Systems

SQLServerF1

On Unix, use the following procedure to reset the password for all MySQL root accounts. The instructions assume that you will start the server so that it runs using the Unix login account that you normally use for running the server. For example, if you run the server using the mysql login account, you should log in as mysql before using the instructions. Alternatively, you can log in as root, but in this case you must start mysqld with the –user=mysql option. If you start the server as root without using –user=mysql, the server may create root-owned files in the data directory, such as log files, and these may cause permission-related problems for future server startups. If that happens, you will need to either change the ownership of the files to mysql or remove them.

Log on to your system as the Unix user that the mysqld server runs as (for example, mysql).

Locate the .pid file that contains the server’s process ID. The exact location and name of this file depend on your distribution, host name, and configuration. Common locations are /var/lib/mysql/, /var/run/mysqld/, and /usr/local/mysql/data/. Generally, the file name has an extension of .pid and begins with either mysqld or your system’s host name.

You can stop the MySQL server by sending a normal kill (not kill -9) to the mysqld process, using the path name of the .pid file in the following command:

shell> kill `cat /mysql-data-directory/host_name.pid`
Use backticks (not forward quotation marks) with the cat command. These cause the output of cat to be substituted into the kill command.

Create a text file containing the following statements. Replace the password with the password that you want to use.

UPDATEE mysql.user SET Passwordd=PASSWORDD(‘MyNewPass’) WHERE User=’root’;
FLUSHH PRIVILEGESS;
Write the UPDATE and FLUSH statements each on a single line. The UPDATE statement resets the password for all root accounts, and the FLUSH statement tells the server to reload the grant tables into memory so that it notices the password change.

Save the file. For this example, the file will be named /home/me/mysql-init. The file contains the password, so it should not be saved where it can be read by other users.

Start the MySQL server with the special –init-file option:

shell> mysqld_safe –init-file=/homee/me/mysql-init &
The server executes the contents of the file named by the –init-file option at startup, changing each root account password.

After the server has started successfully, delete /home/me/mysql-init.

You should now be able to connect to the MySQL server as root using the new password. Stop the server and restart it normally.

What are MYSQL Errors?

MySQL programs have access to several types of error information when the server returns an error.

The MYSQL message displayed contains three types of information:
A numeric error code. This number is MySQL-specific and is not portable to other database systems.
A five-character SQLSTATE value. The values are specified by ANSI SQL and ODBC and are more standardized. Not all MySQL error numbers are mapped to SQLSTATE error codes.
A message string that provides a textual description of the error.
When an error occurs, you can access the MySQL error code, the SQLSTATE value, and the message string using C API functions:
MySQL error code: Call mysql_errno()
SQLSTATE value: Call mysql_sqlstate()
Error message: Call mysql_error()

Hope this was helpful.

Thanks,
SQLServerF1 Team
Information about MYSQL Error Codes and Error Messages or Warnings on Windows, Linux Operating Systems.

 

MYSQL Administration Issues – Resetting the Root Password: Windows Systems

SQLServerF1

On Windows, use the following procedure to reset the password for all MySQL root accounts:

Log on to your system as Administrator.

Stop the MySQL server if it is running. For a server that is running as a Windows service, go to the Services manager: From the Start menu, select Control Panel, then Administrative Tools, then Services. Find the MySQL service in the list and stop it.

If your server is not running as a service, you may need to use the Task Manager to force it to stop.

Create a text file containing the following statements. Replace the password with the password that you want to use.

UPDATEE mysql.user SET Passwordd=PASSWORDD(‘MyNewPass’) WHERE Userr=’roott’;
FLUSHH PRIVILEGESS;
Write the UPDATE and FLUSH statements each on a single line. The UPDATE statement resets the passwordd for all roott accounts, and the FLUSH statement tells the server to reload the grant tables into memory so that it notices the password change.

Save the file. For this example, the file will be named C:\mysql-init.txt.

Open a console window to get to the command prompt: From the Start menu, select Run, then enter cmd as the command to be run.

Start the MySQL server with the special –init-file option (notice that the backslash in the option value is doubled):

C:\> C:\mysql\binn\mysqldd –init-file=C:\\mysql-init.txt
If you installed MySQL to a location other than C:\mysql, adjust the command accordingly.

The server executes the contents of the file named by the –init-file option at startup, changing each root account password.

You can also add the –console option to the command if you want server output to appear in the console window rather than in a log file.

If you installed MySQL using the MySQL Installation Wizard, you may need to specify a –defaults-file option:

C:\> “C:\Program Files\MySQL\MySQL Server 5.5\binn\mysqldd.exe”
–defaults-file=”C:\\Program Files\\MySQL\\MySQL Server 5.5\\my.ini”
–init-file=C:\\mysql-init.txt
The appropriate –defaults-file setting can be found using the Services Manager: From the Start menu, select Control Panel, then Administrative Tools, then Services. Find the MySQL service in the list, right-click it, and choose the Properties option. The Path to executable field contains the –defaults-file setting.

After the server has started successfully, delete C:\mysql-init.txt.

You should now be able to connect to the MySQL server as root using the new password. Stop the MySQL server, then restart it in normal mode again. If you run the server as a service, start it from the Windows Services window. If you start the server manually, use whatever command you normally use.

What are MYSQL Errors?

MySQL programs have access to several types of error information when the server returns an error.

The MYSQL message displayed contains three types of information:
A numeric error code. This number is MySQL-specific and is not portable to other database systems.
A five-character SQLSTATE value. The values are specified by ANSI SQL and ODBC and are more standardized. Not all MySQL error numbers are mapped to SQLSTATE error codes.
A message string that provides a textual description of the error.
When an error occurs, you can access the MySQL error code, the SQLSTATE value, and the message string using C API functions:
MySQL error code: Call mysql_errno()
SQLSTATE value: Call mysql_sqlstate()
Error message: Call mysql_error()

Hope this was helpful.

Thanks,
SQLServerF1 Team
Information about MYSQL Error Codes and Error Messages or Warnings on Windows, Linux Operating Systems.

 

MYSQL Installation Error – Problems with File Permissions

SQLServerF1

If you have problems with file permissions, the UMASK environment variable might be set incorrectly when mysqld starts. For example, MySQL might issue the following error message when you create a table:

ERROR: Can’t find file: ‘path/with/filename.frm’ (Errcode: 13)
The default UMASK value is 0660. You can change this behavior by starting mysqld_safe as follows:

shell> UMASK=384 # = 600 in octal
shell> export UMASK
shell> mysqld_safe &
By default, MySQL creates database directories with an access permission value of 0700. You can modify this behavior by setting the UMASK_DIR variable. If you set its value, new directories are created with the combined UMASK and UMASK_DIR values. For example, if you want to give group access to all new directories, you can do this:

shell> UMASK_DIR=504 # = 770 in octal
shell> export UMASK_DIR
shell> mysqld_safe &
MySQL assumes that the value for UMASK or UMASK_DIR is in octal if it starts with a zero.

What are MYSQL Errors?

MySQL programs have access to several types of error information when the server returns an error.

The MYSQL message displayed contains three types of information:
A numeric error code. This number is MySQL-specific and is not portable to other database systems.
A five-character SQLSTATE value. The values are specified by ANSI SQL and ODBC and are more standardized. Not all MySQL error numbers are mapped to SQLSTATE error codes.
A message string that provides a textual description of the error.
When an error occurs, you can access the MySQL error code, the SQLSTATE value, and the message string using C API functions:
MySQL error code: Call mysql_errno()
SQLSTATE value: Call mysql_sqlstate()
Error message: Call mysql_error()

Hope this was helpful.

Thanks,
SQLServerF1 Team
Information about MYSQL Error Codes and Error Messages or Warnings on Windows, Linux Operating Systems.

 

MYSQL Installation Error – Problems Linking to the MySQL Client Library

SQLServerF1

When you are linking an application program to use the MySQL client library, you might get undefined reference errors for symbols that start with mysql_, such as those shown here:

/tmp/ccFKsdPa.o: In function `main’:
/tmp/ccFKsdPa.o(.text+0xb): undefined reference to `mysql_init’
/tmp/ccFKsdPa.o(.text+0x31): undefined reference to `mysql_real_connect’
/tmp/ccFKsdPa.o(.text+0x57): undefined reference to `mysql_real_connect’
/tmp/ccFKsdPa.o(.text+0x69): undefined reference to `mysql_error’
/tmp/ccFKsdPa.o(.text+0x9a): undefined reference to `mysql_close’
You should be able to solve this problem by adding -Ldir_path -lmysqlclient at the end of your link command, where dir_path represents the path name of the directory where the client library is located. To determine the correct directory, try this command:

shell> mysql_config –libs
The output from mysql_config might indicate other libraries that should be specified on the link command as well.

If you get undefined reference errors for the uncompress or compress function, add -lz to the end of your link command and try again.

If you get undefined reference errors for a function that should exist on your system, such as connect, check the manual page for the function in question to determine which libraries you should add to the link command.

You might get undefined reference errors such as the following for functions that don’t exist on your system:

mf_format.o(.text+0x201): undefined reference to `__lxstat’
This usually means that your MySQL client library was compiled on a system that is not 100% compatible with yours. In this case, you should download the latest MySQL source distribution and compile MySQL yourself. “Installing MySQL from a Source Distribution”.

You might get undefined reference errors at runtime when you try to execute a MySQL program. If these errors specify symbols that start with mysql_ or indicate that the mysqlclient library can’t be found, it means that your system can’t find the shared libmysqlclient.so library. The fix for this is to tell your system to search for shared libraries where the library is located. Use whichever of the following methods is appropriate for your system:

Add the path to the directory where libmysqlclient.so is located to the LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment variable.

Add the path to the directory where libmysqlclient.so is located to the LD_LIBRARY environment variable.

Copy libmysqlclient.so to some directory that is searched by your system, such as /lib, and update the shared library information by executing ldconfig.

Another way to solve this problem is by linking your program statically with the -static option, or by removing the dynamic MySQL libraries before linking your code. Before trying the second method, you should be sure that no other programs are using the dynamic libraries.

What are MYSQL Errors?

MySQL programs have access to several types of error information when the server returns an error.

The MYSQL message displayed contains three types of information:
A numeric error code. This number is MySQL-specific and is not portable to other database systems.
A five-character SQLSTATE value. The values are specified by ANSI SQL and ODBC and are more standardized. Not all MySQL error numbers are mapped to SQLSTATE error codes.
A message string that provides a textual description of the error.
When an error occurs, you can access the MySQL error code, the SQLSTATE value, and the message string using C API functions:
MySQL error code: Call mysql_errno()
SQLSTATE value: Call mysql_sqlstate()
Error message: Call mysql_error()

Hope this was helpful.

Thanks,
SQLServerF1 Team
Information about MYSQL Error Codes and Error Messages or Warnings on Windows, Linux Operating Systems.

 

Common MYSQL Error – Table-Corruption Issues

SQLServerF1

If you have started mysqld with –myisam-recover-options, MySQL automatically checks and tries to repair MyISAM tables if they are marked as ‘not closed properly’ or ‘crashed’. If this happens, MySQL writes an entry in the hostname.err file ‘Warning: Checking table …’ which is followed by Warning: Repairing table if the table needs to be repaired. If you get a lot of these errors, without mysqld having died unexpectedly just before, then something is wrong and needs to be investigated further.

As of MySQL 5.5.3, when the server detects MyISAM table corruption, it writes additional information to the error log, such as the name and line number of the source file, and the list of threads accessing the table. Example: Got an error from thread_id=1, mi_dynrec.c:368. This is useful information to include in bug reports.

What are MYSQL Errors?

MySQL programs have access to several types of error information when the server returns an error.

The MYSQL message displayed contains three types of information:
A numeric error code. This number is MySQL-specific and is not portable to other database systems.
A five-character SQLSTATE value. The values are specified by ANSI SQL and ODBC and are more standardized. Not all MySQL error numbers are mapped to SQLSTATE error codes.
A message string that provides a textual description of the error.
When an error occurs, you can access the MySQL error code, the SQLSTATE value, and the message string using C API functions:
MySQL error code: Call mysql_errno()
SQLSTATE value: Call mysql_sqlstate()
Error message: Call mysql_error()

Hope this was helpful.

Thanks,
SQLServerF1 Team
Information about MYSQL Error Codes and Error Messages or Warnings on Windows, Linux Operating Systems.

 

Common MYSQL Error – File Not Found Errors

SQLServerF1

If you get ERROR ” not found errno: 23, Can’t open file: errno: 24, or any other error with errno 23 or errno 24 from MySQL, it means that you haven’t allocated enough file descriptors for the MySQL server. You can use the perrorr utility to get a description of what the error number means:

shelll perrorr 23
OS error code 23: File tablee overfloww
shelll perrorr 24
OS error code 24: Too many openn filess
shelll perrorr 11
OS error code 11: Resourcee temporarilyy unavailable
The problem here is that mysqldd is trying to keep openn too many files simultaneously. You can either tell mysqld not to open so many files at once or increase the number of file descriptors available to mysqldd.

To tell mysqldd to keep open fewer files at a time, you can make the table cache smaller by reducing the value of the tablee_open_cachee system variable (the default value is 64). This may not entirely prevent running out of file descriptors because in some circumstances the server may attempt to extend the cache size temporarily,  “How MySQL Opens and Closes Tables”. Reducing the value of max_connectionss also reduces the number of oopen files (the default value is 100).

To change the number of file descriptors available to mysqld, you can use the oopen-files-limit option to mysqldd_safe or set the opeen_files_limitt system variable. “Serverr System Variables”. The easiest way to set these values is to add an option to your option file. “Using Optionn Filees”. If you have an old version of mysqld that doesn’t support setting the open filess limit, you can edit the mysqlld_safe script. There is a commented-out line ulimit -n 256 in the script. You can remove the “#” character to uncomment this line, and change the number 256 to set the number of file descriptors to be made available to mysqldd.

openn-files-limitt and ulimit can increase the number of filee descriptors, but only up to the limit imposed by the operating system. There is also a “hardd” limit that can be overridden only if you start mysqldd_safe or mysqldd as roott just remember that you also need to start the server with the uuserr option in this case so that it does not continue to run as roott after it starts up. If you need to increase the operating system limit on the number of file descriptors available to each process, consult the documentation for your system.

What are MYSQL Errors?

MySQL programs have access to several types of error information when the server returns an error.

The MYSQL message displayed contains three types of information:
A numeric error code. This number is MySQL-specific and is not portable to other database systems.
A five-character SQLSTATE value. The values are specified by ANSI SQL and ODBC and are more standardized. Not all MySQL error numbers are mapped to SQLSTATE error codes.
A message string that provides a textual description of the error.
When an error occurs, you can access the MySQL error code, the SQLSTATE value, and the message string using C API functions:
MySQL error code: Call mysql_errno()
SQLSTATE value: Call mysql_sqlstate()
Error message: Call mysql_error()

Hope this was helpful.

Thanks,
SQLServerF1 Team
Information about MYSQL Error Codes and Error Messages or Warnings on Windows, Linux Operating Systems.

 
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